LLVM Project Blog

LLVM Project News and Details from the Trenches

Monday, August 18, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #33, Aug 18th 2014

Welcome to the thirty-third issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects.LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury.Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.

Monday, August 11, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #32, Aug 11th 2014

Welcome to the thirty-second issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects. LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury.Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

Some readers may be interested to know that lowRISC, a project to produce a fully open-source SoC started by a number of us at the University of Cambridge Computer Lab has been announced. We are hiring.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.

Monday, August 4, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #31, Aug 4th 2014

Welcome to the thirty-first issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects. LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury. Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.

Monday, July 28, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #30, Jul 28th 2014

Welcome to the thirtieth issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects. LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury. Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.

Monday, July 21, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #29, Jul 21st 2014

Welcome to the twenty-ninth issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects.LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury.Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

This is a special extended issue which I'm choosing to subtitle "LLVM Weekly visits the GNU Tools Cauldron". The event took place over the weekend and had a wide range of interesting talks. You can find my notes at the end of this newsletter. Talks were recorded and the videos should be made available in the next month or two.

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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

FTL: WebKit’s LLVM based JIT

Over the past year, the WebKit project made tremendous progress on the ability to optimize JavaScript applications. A major part of that effort was the introduction of the Fourth Tier LLVM (FTL) JIT. The Fourth Tier JIT targets long-running JavaScript content and performs a level of optimization beyond WebKit's interpreter, baseline JIT, and high-level optimizing JIT. See the FTL Optimization Strategy section below for more on WebKit's tiered optimizations. The engineering advancements within WebKit that made the FTL possible were described by Filip Pizlo in the Surfin' Safari Blog post, Introducing the WebKit FTL JIT. On April 29, 2014, the WebKit team enabled FTL by default on trunk: r167958.

This achievement also represents a significant milestone for the LLVM community. FTL makes it clear that LLVM can be used to accelerate a dynamically type checked languages in a competitive production environment. This in itself is a tremendous success story and shows the advantage of the highly modular and flexible design of LLVM. It is the first time that the LLVM infrastructure has supported self-modifying code, and the first time profile guided information has been used inside the LLVM JIT. Even though this project pioneered new territory for LLVM, it was in no way an academic exercise. To be successful, FTL must perform at least as well as non-FTL JavaScript engines in use today across a range of workloads without compromising reliability. This post describes the technical aspects of that accomplishment that relate to LLVM and future opportunities for LLVM to improve JIT compilation and the LLVM infrastructure overall.

Read on for more information.

Monday, July 14, 2014

LLVM Weekly - #28, Jul 14th 2014

Welcome to the twenty-eighth issue of LLVM Weekly, a weekly newsletter (published every Monday) covering developments in LLVM, Clang, and related projects. LLVM Weekly is brought to you by Alex Bradbury.Subscribe to future issues at http://llvmweekly.org and pass it on to anyone else you think may be interested. Please send any tips or feedback to asb@asbradbury.org, or @llvmweekly or @asbradbury on Twitter.

I'll be at the GNU Tools Cauldron 2014 next weekend, being held at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory (which handily is also where I work). If you're there, do say hi.

The canonical home for this issue can be found here at llvmweekly.org.